Melody

This 2014 South Korean film on con artists and deceptions was a fun, entertaining watch.

When it comes to cracking open safe and counterfeiting, no one beats Ji-Hyeok (starring Kim Woo-Bin). With Koo-In (starring Ko Chang-Seok) as his sidekick (he is more into the mechanical works), they have worked on countless "projects" without fail. Koo-In then introduces elite hacker, Jong-Bae (starring Lee Hyun-Woo) to Ji-Hyeok so as the trio could work with each of their expertise to steal some very valuable jewellery at a high-end jewellery store. That store's owner is none other than Director Jo (starring Kim Young-Chul), and he has plans for the trio.

Director Jo has been eyeing the stacks of million dollars which are stored in the highly secured Korean customs in Incheon. He believes that all would be benefited from the fraud once they have their hands on the money; after all the trio wouldn't know of this information without him, isn't it? The trio then work on a plan on how to get past the security and how to get the money out safely without alarming the custom staff with their fully equipped high technology gadgets.

But of course there is always a fault when it comes to high risk jobs; and all the more when trust and greed become an issue and this is where the plot starts to thicken and intensify.

As I mentioned before, this film was an entertaining watch. Kim Woo-Bin played a charismatic thief with brains and Lee Hyun-Woo was a cute hacker to boot. I didn't want to say more about the story to avoid spoilers but suffice it to say I enjoyed it. 


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Melody

Penguin | December 2016 | 368 pgs
Source: Library



14th November, 1980. Annie Doyle is murdered while she is out discussing a deal with Andew Fitzsimons, a High Court judge who would do anything to please his wife, Lydia. Annie's body is quickly buried in their garden, after all nowhere else is safer than your own property, isn't it? Avalon is their luxurious house and no one has access without their permission, especially when the Fitzsimons' reputation is concerned. Avalon is an old estate which has passed on by Lydia's father and her grandfather, and Lydia would hang onto it fiercely no matter whatever the circumstances is. Little does they know that their only teenage son, Laurence, got home early on that fateful night and has questions about their lies.

Karen Doyle isn't convinced that her sister, Annie is dead and is adamant of finding her on her own. The investigations have long been ceased after there wasn't any lead on the case and with Annie's notorious behaviour of a wild loose girl, everyone believes she might have flee her Dublin home and move in some other places with a new identity. Karen thinks otherwise; she knew her sister plus there isn't anything missing from her rented place. The years go by and some circumstances led Laurence and Karen befriended each other. And what happened in the past would begin to unravel slowly and by then the wheels of motion has been set and it is not stopping until another tragedy strikes.

Told from three persons' POV, Lying in Wait was an absorbing read about an unplanned murder go haywire. While this story doesn't have a cast of unreliable narrators, many of them are not particularly likeable. This whydunit kind of suspense has a strong sense of foreboding and intrigue that made this an unputdownable book. As the story progresses, readers will get to know more about these three narrators and their history, and what they would do to protect the person they loved. The ending would absolutely chill you and set you thinking at the same time.



© 2017 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody


Quercus | February 2017 | 384 pgs
Source: Library



The Chalk Pit is the ninth installment of Elly Griffiths' Dr Ruth Galloway mystery and though I jumped into this book without any idea of the characterisations or the writing style, I found myself enjoying this book featuring the main protagonist and DCI Harry Nelson working together during their investigations.

When some human bones are found buried beneath the grounds of an old chalk-mining tunnel in Norwich during an excavation for a new development project, Ruth thinks they are probably medieval although she is skeptical about their translucence appearance; a sign that they were boiled soon after death.

On the other end, DCI Nelson and his team are following up on a case of a missing homeless woman named Barbara after a few fellow homeless people reported not seeing her for weeks. There are some rumours about underground societies, ritual activities and even cannibalism but Ruth remains objective. Then two homeless people were found murdered and two more women were reported missing that make Ruth and the police think that there are something more than meet the eye surrounding the underground tunnels and they may have to dig deeper to unravel the mystery.

Despite my limited knowledge of the cast of characters, I found myself absorbed in this book quickly and it didn't take me too much time to get to know more about the characters and I loved it that way considering I was new to this series and on top of it I read it out of order. Ruth and Nelson are two very engaging characters with their past history and their complicated relationship (Nelson has two grown up children with his wife and another younger daughter with Ruth. Nelson stay married to his wife and his relationship with Ruth is considered more like friends. However, something happened along the way which I think might alter these characters' perspective and I'm very curious to see where this would take them in the future books.)

Another thing worth mentioning is the insight of the homeless people while reading this book. The author has covered several aspects about their circumstances and experiences which I couldn't help but to feel for them and while some were poor and not highly educated, a few had actually led a normal life until some situations pushed them off the edge.

All in all this was an intriguing read. Most of all, the dynamic between Ruth and Nelson kept me engaged throughout the book. I'll be sure to check out the other books of this series.



© 2017 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

Grand Central Publishing | February 2015 | 352 pgs
Source: Library



This first novel by Sandra Block is a story about Freudian nightmare and the dark side of memories, family and the strain and bond that connect us all, as well as the discovery of one's own empathy. 

Dr. Zoe Goldman is a resident in training in a psychiatric ward in Buffalo, New York. Aside from tending to troubled patients, she is intrigued by a new patient who murdered her mother. While Sofia's case is disturbing, Zoe on the other end has her own baggage; she was adopted and she wants to know why and how her biological mother passed, especially she has been plagued by nightmares of a fire during her childhood. To complicate matters, her adoptive mother loses her memory to dementia and she has to rely on her own to search for the answers. 

Of course we all know that the truth might not be pleasant and what we know might hurt us; so ultimately Zoe would find out the truth surrounding her past and well, what a surprise it was. 

I read Little Black Lies with no idea where this story would take me so I enjoyed that moment of having the story unveiling itself to me. Zoe was an interesting character with some emotional baggage. Overall, the story was intriguing but I thought there's still room for improvement concerning the characters' development. That being said, Little Black Lies was an intriguing read and I am curious where the author would take us in her next Zoe Goldman series, The Girl Without a Name


© 2017 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody


Houghton Mifflin | January 2016 | 288 pgs
Source: Library


The Poison Artist was an extraordinary mystery I read among many others; one which totally engaged me from the beginning till the end with the writer's prose right up to how this story was skilfully crafted and told.

Dr. Caleb Maddox is a toxicologist and he is also studying the chemical effects of pain. One evening after a fallout with his artist girlfriend, he goes to a bar and encounter a mysterious woman. Bewitched by her quiet and seductive demeanour over a glass of absinthe, he knew he has to find her by every means.

During his search, there were a few missing men who turned up dead and the post-mortems are inconclusive. Henry, who is Caleb's old friend and a medical examiner, has secretly sought Caleb's insight on the chemical evidence left on the victims' bodies. It turned out that one of the victims was at the same bar the night Caleb frequented; the night which he encountered the mysterious woman.

What follows subsequently was a series of searching and finding answers both from Inspector Kennon as well as Caleb. And as the story progresses, Caleb's search for the killer as well as the mysterious woman entwine and the closer he gets to them he finds himself more confused and putting him in an unfavourable position.

The Poison Artist was a lethally gripping thriller which entranced this reader from its first page till the last. The author's writing was precise and well-written; I found the scenes between Caleb and the mysterious woman to be the most engaging and all the time I was both fascinated and wary of her. Caleb, on the other hand, was obsessed by her despite he knew very little of this woman and that too often her appearance in places are deemed to be questionable. Most of all, I liked it that this story threw me off with its surprises, though I think the outcome may not appease to all readers. Still, I would recommend this to readers who love a good mystery. 


© 2017 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.