Melody

Atria Books | 4 May 2021 | 384 pgs
Source: Library 

48-year-old Jennifer Barnes receives the most shocking news when she goes for her doctor’s appointment after a series of symptoms that's plagued her for months. She has glioblastoma - a brain cancer and that she has only six weeks left to live. The test result reported that there's a high dose of lead in her blood and that this may have already started a year ago as the tumor started to spread gradually. 

While Jennifer is reeling from the news, she's also curious about how the lead got into her body in the first place. She knew that plumbing that contains lead can contaminate water, or they could be leached into food or drinks as well. Jennifer could only suspect her husband because he's been pestering her for a divorce for a while and she didn't give in to his request. It isn't that she still has feelings for him, she's just angry that he has had an affair and he's leaving her for a much younger woman. 

Her adult triplets, on the other hand, took the news differently. Emily is the eldest and a fraternal triplet unlike Aline and Miranda. Emily has her own family and issues but she's willing to stand by her mother's side physically and emotionally. Aline and Miranda aren't close with their mother, but Aline agrees to look into the lead issue (she's in bio research field) and even the imprudent Miranda moves into Jennifer's house although one might wonder about her reason and think of her financial difficulties. But despite everything, the daughters feel that Jennifer is being paranoid in doubting their father, and this leads Jennifer wondering if her condition has worsened as she starts imagining things. Or is it not? 

I've read and enjoyed a few of Catherine McKenzie's previous novels so I was excited to read this latest book but regrettably I didn't feel the same thrill and excitement I'd had with her other books. To begin with, I didn't feel any connection with the characters. Perhaps they're all unlikeable characters, but still Jennifer's sensitive role didn't allow me to fully empathise with her either and I think it might be more or less to do with her voice in this story. While I understand this is more of a domestic drama than a psychological thriller, I was fazed as well as saddened by the dynamics of this (dysfunctional) family. Unfortunately, I couldn't discuss the issue without spoiling the story but nevertheless, this still made an interesting read based on the identities and characteristics of the characters. Although this book isn't a favourite, I'd still look out for McKenzie's future releases. 
© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

Michael Joseph | 21 January 2021 | 400 pgs
Source: Purchased 

If anyone ask me how would I describe C.J. Tudor's books, I'd say they're brooding and foreboding; and that she sure knows how to get her readers invested in the characters she's created. 

The Burning Girls started with a bang with an explosive prologue which the reader will soon know it's a flashback. What follows thereafter is our protagonist, Reverend Jack Brooks learning that she has to transfer to a small church in Chapel Croft until they've found a replacement. Jack doesn't want to go, partly of her 15-year-old daughter Flo, but they've given her no choice. 

Jack and Flo soon learn that Chapel Croft is far more than a quiet English countryside and it has a dark history surrounding the Sussex Martyrs during the religious persecutions of Queen Mary in 1556; whereby eight villagers were burnt at the stake, including two young girls. Each year on the anniversary of the purge, the residents will set alight of some small twig dolls they called Burning Girls to commemorate and honour the martyrs who died. As much as Jack is intrigued by this age-old tradition, she's more concerned about the suicide of her predecessor, Reverend Fletcher and the disappearance case of two young girls thirty years ago. No one knows what happened to Merry and Joy after all these time, but the residents assume that they'd simply run away from home and have gradually accepted their disappearance. 

As Jack and Flo try to adjust to their new life in this close-knit community, bad things start to happen. For starters, someone is sending her mysterious twig dolls, then Flo claims she's seen the apparitions of the burning girls in the chapel. And of course, the question that plagued Jack regarding Reverend Fletcher's suicide and why no one wants to talk about it. As much as Jack wants to find out the truth, she's also concerned about Flo's safety and well-being especially with her interactions with two teenage delinquents and a guy whom Flo just got acquainted with. And then, there's someone from Jack's past whom she tries to avoid has come to Chapel Croft for her.  

As you can see, there are multiple layers and subplots to this pacey story and despite the various threads Tudor has laid out, the conclusion was nicely tied up in a bow. The atmospheric setting was well done - from the creepy old chapel to an abandoned old building in the woods filled with graffiti of various evil symbols. The portrayal of the characters are vivid and believable; and I liked how Tudor created Reverend Jack Brooks to be a flawed, complex character with strength and weaknesses, as well as her role as both a (woman) vicar and a mother with different perspectives. Without saying more, this was an intense and a riveting suspense which I'm sure would thrill Tudor's fans and gain new readers as well. 

Last but not least, I want to thank Lark for reading this book with me as part of our buddy read "assignments". Please visit her blog for her review and the Q&A. Here's her questions to me:

1. This is the second book by C.J. Tudor that we've read together--which one did you like better, The Chalk Man or The Burning Girls? Why?
I enjoyed both of the books, but I think I loved this one a bit more because of the atmospheric setting, the characters (in particularly Reverend Jack Brooks and Flo) and the various genres/issues implemented into this story. (Click here for Chalk Man review.)

2. How do you feel about the role that the legend of the burning girls played in this novel? (Too much, or not enough?)
I'd expected that there'd be more backstory of the legend of the burning girls, but regrettably there aren't much elaborations about them as I thought the martyrdom might add more intrigue and depth to this story. Then again, this is only a part of Chapel Croft history and not the main core of the story so I'd let this pass. 😉

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Melody

 

Crooked Lane Books | 7 September 2021 | 288 pgs
Source: Publisher via NetGalley 

I enjoyed Christopher Swann's previous novel (Never Turn Back) so much so that I requested this book after seeing that it's his latest release. 

Part suspense and part spy thriller, this story revolves around a retired history professor finding retreat in an isolated North Carolina mountains after the death of his wife and how his quiet life is turned upside down when a teenage girl barges into his life one day and claims that she is his niece. 

Nick Anthony has not been in contact with his younger brother for years and their relationship is gradually explained as the story progresses. Despite the distance, he is still shocked when he learns that his estranged brother and sister-in-law died in a house fire and that he has a niece who's managed to find him amid everything else. Annalise couldn't trust anyone, but she knew that she should seek her uncle's help especially learning that her parents' death wasn't an accident and the mysterious information she was told to pass on to her uncle before their death. And on top of it, she's being pursued by a bunch of hired private military contractors for the piece of information she's carrying. Nick doesn't know what kind of business and who his late brother had been dealing with, but he's adamant to find out about his hidden past as well as to protect Annalise from any harm. But what the reader didn't know is, Nick has his own hidden past, too. 

While the plot isn't new, I've to say I enjoyed reading about Nick as the main character and his relationship with Annalise. There are, of course, some intense moments and the cat-and-mouse chase but surprisingly, I was more focused on the interactions between uncle and niece; and Annalise for her courage and her fighting spirit. I liked this book but not as much as Never Turn Back but overall it was still a satisfying read.

© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

 

Michael Joseph | 7 January 2021 | 320 pgs
Source: Purchased 

For starters, it's hard to read this book, let alone writing my thoughts. The story is dark and unsettling; yet one couldn't avoid looking at some of the issues raised.

As a girl, Blythe Connor is raised lacking warmth and attention from her mother, Cecilia. Now that she'd grown up and married, she's aiming to be a woman unlike her mother and most importantly, she doesn't want sad history to repeat itself. After Violet is born, she makes sure she gives enough love and attention to Violet. She's sure nothing would go wrong if she's doing all the right things to her first child and hopefully, Violet would grow up to be a happy and healthy girl unlike her unhappy past. 

As the days go by, Blythe soon notices that there's something about Violet that she can't put her finger on it. Her husband, Fox, thinks otherwise and believes that Blythe is either imagining things or motherhood is tiring her out. As Blythe thinks about Violet's characteristics, she also couldn't help wondering about her childhood life as well as the mental wellness and upbringing of the women in her family heritage. Her grandmother, Etta, suffered from mental illness and as a result, Cecilia was raised without much mother's love and this in turn, affects Blythe’s life growing up. Blythe begins questioning herself if she's following the path of the women of her family generations - that they couldn't and didn't have the capacity of filling the role of a mother. Or perhaps as what she fears, there's really something wrong with Violet? 

Unreliable narrator. Motherhood. Nature versus nurture. These are the few elements that nudged at my mind as I read the book and the more I read, I felt a sense of dread, unease and sorrow as well. Blythe was a complex character; and of course this extends to Violet as well as I didn't know what's really in that little mind of hers. Is she capable of doing bad things, or if genes and characteristics could pass down from generations, affecting one's role of being a mother? And then, there's the issues of expectations and stereotypical role as a mother. How do one look at motherhood and is there even a right or wrong way of bringing up a child? 

There's so much to talk about this book and I could see why there's so much hype surrounding it when it was released. Perhaps it's just me, but I didn't quite like the storytelling style which was written in second person narrative. Although there's some interpretations of Cecilia's life in between chapters, there's no indication of what's past and present though to the author's credit, it wasn't hard to figure so it's simply a personal view/preference. Overall it was a thought-provoking read and I could see this as a good fit for discussions. 
© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

Hello my dear readers! To begin with, I'm so sorry that my posts have been sparse lately. This applies the same to my blog hopping and commenting and for these I want to say sorry, too. Life has been hectic and it seems like this has somewhat affected my reading momentum in some way. Of course, there're also some personal stuff that was taking away my attention and I just want to say, never underestimate the small mundane things that we're taking for granted. No, there's nothing wrong with my health although I'd be thankful if my usual old problems will just go away, ha. Now that I've got these off my plate, let me share with you what I've been reading lately.

I'd finished reading Ling Jing's (笭菁) first installment of her new series (林投劫) featuring a variety of supernatural characters. I loved her two urban legends series and although I was sad to see they'd come to an end, it was good to see Ling Jing has quickly started on a new series; this time around surrounding a family of supernatural characters (humans included) helping to solve some mysterious cases. Like the urban legends series, the author would base from the origins and have the story twisted accordingly to her imaginations. This first installment revolves around a woman who was murdered but was led to believe as a suicidal hanging case. The fiction then extend its plot by recreating her character as a ghost seeking for truth and revenge. And that's where the family will come in as they'll help to solve the case, but they'd not meddle with fate and any karmic forces which may link to the victim and the perpetrator. I like the idea of this new series and I'm definitely looking forward to reading more. 


I'm currently reading The Push by Ashley Audrain and it's an absorbing read about the exploration of motherhood. While there's psychological and family drama, I'd say this is more of a case of characters study as well as the values, expectations and challenges of women becoming mothers. I can't say more as I'm only into half of the book, but it's definitely a powerful and a thought-provoking book that fits for discussions. 


My library visits have become an irregular routine since the safety regulations often change as and when accordingly to current situation, thus I'm currently turning my attention more to my TBR pile and book acquisitions although I'll still borrow books whenever I can. Here are some of my recent book buys: Hostage by Clare Mackintosh, The Drowning Kind by Jennifer McMahon, Beneath Devil's Bridge by Loreth Anne White and The Boys' Club by Erica Katz. 

Hope you've a great day and happy reading! 


© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

 

Joffe Books | 15 June 2021 | 278 pgs
Source: Publisher via NetGalley 

"Please forgive me. I couldn't live with it. Hopefully you can, Officer Raycevic."

When Lena Nguyen received the above text message from her estranged twin sister, Cambry, she thought nothing about it until she found out about her suicide much later. Based on the police report, Cambry had driven to Hairpin Bridge; a remote bridge seventy miles outside of Missoula, Montana, and jumped to her death. Lena may not be close with Cambry, but she knew her personality and that she's not the kind who'd give up a fight easily. And the more she read Cambry's last text, the more she find something is amiss so she decided to have a talk with Corporal Raymond Raycevic. After all, he's the highway patrolman who'd allegedly discovered Cambry's body. 

Lena is all prepared before meeting Officer Raycevic for the interview at Hairpin Bridge. She's even carried a cassette recorder along so she could have Raycevic's statement as a record. Raycevic has been sympathetic and professional towards Lena as he told her that he'd stopped Cambry for speeding before discovering her mangled body an hour later on that fateful day. Based from Raycevic's report, Cambry had leapt to her death although the motive was unclear. Lena knew Cambry had been living a wild life but to choose a death path doesn't seemed her style. On top of it, Raycevic's statement seemed a bit off, too. How'd he discover Cambry's body and right after he'd stopped her car an hour ago? And most of all, her  unexplainable sixteen attempted 911 calls dialled from a dead zone. Did Cambry call before her so-called suicide? Or is it Raycevic who's responsible for her death? 

I've enjoyed Taylor Adams' previous psychological thriller, No Exit. It was an intense wild ride filled with twists and turns and this book is no exception. Adams' writing has that cinematic style that hook you easily and never let your attention go until the final page. I especially loved how he created his female characters to be courageous and feisty; showing their strengths as they're faced with challenges amid their vulnerable situations. I think I enjoyed this book a bit more than No Exit as it captured the complicated relationship between the twin sisters as well as Lena's side of Cambry's story. As the story slowly unravels, we see some parallels and the truth and personally this storytelling works for me. And I'm glad to say Taylor Adams has now become one of my favourite authors.  

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Melody

HQ | 18 February 2021 | 448 pgs
Source: Library 


The story begins with a gruesome murder case of mutilated body parts scattering in different locations in Deptford. DI Angelica Henley and TDC Salim Ramouter are tasked to investigate this case. Angelica is once again roused by the dark memories of her previous investigation of serial killer Peter Olivier, a.k.a. The Jigsaw Killer, who's currently serving a life sentence for all the murders he'd committed. Obviously, the recent case is the work of a copycat and the duo is adamant to bring this perpetrator to justice. And this leads to Angelica's visit to the prison, hoping she could find some answers from Peter whether or not if he's told anyone about his plans, modus operandi or even if there's an accomplice. 

While imitation may be a form of flattery, Peter doesn't see it that way. Instead, he's enraged that someone is using his name and his same methods for whatever reasons while he's being hole up in a cell, helpless and couldn't do anything. This is when he decides to take things into his own hands; and this time around nothing could stop him. Soon, Angelica and Ramouter find themselves chasing not one but two serial killers instead. 

The Jigsaw Man is not for the faint-hearted; and personally I find it to be a gritty police procedural combined with a case of characters study. Angelica is flawed and suffered from PTSD, but she's determined and in some ways fearless, too. Her comradeship with Ramouter is complicated, yet they work seamlessly the more they get to know each other. However, her relationship with her husband needs more work, though. 

The author's writing was engaging, but at times the intensity was cut short due to some in-depth backstory and character developments but this isn't a complaint and is more of a personal observation. I think the best moment was the exchanges between Angelica and Peter and it's always interesting to hear the side of a criminal's story even if they creep you out. Overall this was a satisfying read, and I'm hoping to see more of Angelica and Ramouter in the author's future releases. 
© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody


Crooked Lane Books | 8 June 2021 | 304 pgs
Source: Publisher via Edelweiss 


Heather Evans returns to her old home after her mother's baffling suicide. While clearing the stuff she's discovered something alarming about her late mother and the things she'd kept - stacks of letters from the notorious serial killer, Michael Reave (a.k.a. The "Red Wolf"). Reave has been in prison for over twenty years and it seems that her late mother had been secretly corresponding with him for decades. Reave is known of his gruesome and ritualistic murders of several women although he's always protested his innocence. 

When a young woman's body is found and the modus operandi is similar to Reave's, Heather decided that she needs to find out about her mother's past and her communications with Reave. Her info sharing of her mother's correspondence with Reave with the police lands her a visit to the prison as everyone hopes that Reave will talk and hopefully shed some light on the recent murder. While Reave remains vague about his past and doesn't seem to offer anything useful relevant to the recent case, he does speak in riddles about some Grimm's fairy tales, in particularly the Red Riding Hood. As Heather communicates more with Reave, she learns that her late mother and Reave do know each other way back when they were living in Fiddler's Mill, a hippy commune in the 70s. Now Heather's biggest question is: what is the relationship between her late mother and Reave and what's her role in all these mayhem?

This story was incredibly dark and broody in some ways which suits the serial killer theme. There was a part about animal cruelty which I quickly skimmed over; and the rest was quite an atmospheric read especially some references to the Red Riding Hood and Reave's past as a boy and his relationship with a mysterious man. Despite an intriguing opening, the story was a slow burn and Heather sometimes made poor, dubious decisions that frustrate the reader. I also feel some characters are not fleshed out enough but the portrayal of Reave as a boy and how he tells his story to Heather in a mythological way was rather fascinating. I may have dived into this book with a high expectation so I was a bit disappointed with the execution and some of the characterisations which I feel would make a better read should they are more well elaborated. That said, if you're into atmospheric books then this one may be of interest to you. 
© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

 

G.P. Putnam's Sons | 3 August 2021 | 352 pgs
Source: Publisher via Edelweiss 

Megan Abbott is good at writing complexity relationship in her female characters and in this book she brings her readers into the world of ballet whereby the dynamics of a family is about to change after a stranger break into their once well-constructed ties. 

Dara and Marie Durant are trained as ballet dancers since young. Their mother was once a famous ballet dancer and owned a ballet studio but an automobile accident claimed her and her husband's lives. The ballet studio is then passed on to the sisters; and together with Dara's husband, Charlie, they run the studio with the sisters as trainers and Charlie oversee the administration part. Charlie was once their mother's prized student but he'd stopped dancing after an injury. There are, of course, some challenges operating the studio and with the annual Nutcracker performance coming up, the trio feels the stress as not only do they have to make preparations but they're also a bit tight with the financials, too. When a fire broke out and destroyed part of the studio, they've no choice but to engage a contractor for the renovation. 

Enter Derek, a charming smooth talker who not only coax Charlie into signing some projects agreements but also seems to have Marie captivated. Derek's arrival has not only shaken Dara's equilibrium but also messes up the balance of their routines. Dara feels his hold on Marie has put a strain on their sisterly bond; and most of all she feels he has an agenda. As the story slowly unravel, Derek's pushover leads to the unveiling of some secrets surrounding the Durants' past, forcing them all to face a shocking truth which may crumble their worlds. 

The Turnout is one taut mystery and it consists of some issues which may unnerve the reader at times (like machoism and sexual innuendos). Megan's writing is engaging as always, and what I love most about her books is the sensitivity and the attention she put in when writing about her (female) characters and their emotions. Aside from the family dynamics and Derek's agenda, the ballet world is an interesting read too. There's a Chinese idiom: "Ten years of practice for one minute on stage", which says a lot about these ballet dancers' hard work and the pain they've to face (those pointe technique!) Although this is not my favourite Megan Abbott book, it still makes a riveting read.  
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Melody
Crooked Lane Books | 7 September 2021 | 336 pgs
Source: Publisher via NetGalley 


Fourteen years ago, Bryn Collins moved to a quiet place far away from the city in Tennessee to escape and to heal her broken heart after learning that her fiance, Sawyer, had left her for her younger sister, Del. Surrounded by nature and living like a farmer, Bryn thought she's finally found peace and has gradually let go of the past until one day, 14-year-old Josh comes knocking at her door, claiming that he is her nephew and that his mother is missing. Sawyer had passed during a plane crash accident and Josh has no one to turn to, but his mother had left him a note about his aunt in case anything happens and so here he is. 

Bryn would be lying if she admit that she isn't bothered by Sawyer's and Del's betrayal. To this day, she still didn't understand why Sawyer would do such a thing to her. She has no qualms about Del's reckless behaviours though; after all she's always been living a wild and a carefree life. As Bryn wonders about her whereabouts, she is confronted by Carl and learns that Bryn had owed him some money. Carl has always been a hoodlum since they were teenagers; and he threatens Bryn that he wouldn't let things off easily if she couldn't bring Del to him within a week. Bryn and Josh then travel across the states till they stop at Colorado, where they finally find the shocking truth amid the annual Mountain Games competition. 

Over the Falls was a slow burn despite the theme surrounding whitewater rapids and kayaking but it was still an engaging read given the much focus on the characters developments and the interactions between Bryn and Josh. Del's disappearance is the mystery and also a drive to these two characters amid their issues and insecurities in general. Although the mystery intrigued me (and yes, there are some twists as well), I was most drawn towards the growing bond between Bryn and Josh as they race against time in finding Del and the real truth behind her disappearance. 

© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

 

Bantam Press | 1 January 2021 | 387 pgs
Source: Purchased 

There's been some hype surrounding this book when it was first released. Chosen as a Reese's bookclub read and a story centers around an abandoned sanatorium turned five-star luxury hotel set in the Swiss Alps, I just knew I've to read it. 

Elin Warner is taking her leave from her job as a detective due to PTSD issue when she receives an invitation from her estranged brother, Isaac, to celebrate his engagement with his fiancée, Laure. Laure is their long-time friend and Elin knew she has no reason not to accept; and most importantly she has something to ask Isaac regarding their younger brother's death which has plagued her for years. She's suspected Isaac was responsible for Sam's death, but she isn't sure given the time and her young age when the incident happened. 

Together with Elin’s boyfriend, Will, they arrive at the isolated getaway and straightaway Elin feels unease with the atmospheric building and it gets worsen with the threatening snowstorm. Elin also learned that the hotel is owned by the Caron siblings, Lucas and Cécile and the former is friends with architect Daniel Lemaitre, who'd gone missing after the hotel project went on with much protests from the locals. When Laure goes missing the following day, Elin's investigative instincts kick in and the situation got worse after they find an employee is murdered. With the storm and the avalanche, they are left on their own and Elin has to overcome her anxiety and her demons of the past in order to continue with the investigation. 

The atmospheric and claustrophobic setting both make a wonderful plot for this locked-room mystery. Sarah Pearse scored a perfect score in this department as she brings her setting to life through her vivid descriptions right from the old sanatorium to the modern luxurious hotel. Her cast of characters is intriguing though not all are likeable. The intrigue and the intensity are another draw but alas, the setup is weakened by the execution, the lack of connection between the sanatorium and the hotel and regrettably, the motive and the ending also leave much to be desired. That said, this is a debut novel and there's potential in the author's writing so I'll still check out her next release. 

Finally, I want to thank Lark for reading this book with me as part of our buddy read 'assignments' and please do check out Lark's blog for her review, too! 😊 Here's her questions to me regarding the book:

1) That isolated snowy setting is always a favorite of mine (and yours, too), what are some of your other favorite settings to read about in books?
Aside from the isolated snowy setting, I also love reading about the wilderness and the oceanic world. In short, anything to do with the beauty and the unpredictables of nature and I'm in. 

2) The cover classifies The Sanatorium as a "Gothic thriller" but it felt less Gothic thriller and more regular mystery to me. What do you think? How would you classify this book? 
I totally agree with Lark on this. It was atmospheric but doesn't really classifies as a Gothic thriller (not much focus on the sanatorium in my opinion and some parts aren't fully explained, too). Personally, I'd think a suspense thriller is more suitable to this book. 
© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

 

Lake Union Publishing | 1 August 2018 | 268 pgs
Source: Library 

Jane is working as a data entry clerk in an insurance company. At first glance, she's simple and meek and at times, insecure about herself. Her pretty face and her personality catches the attention of the company's manager, Steven Hepsworth; and likewise Steven caught Jane's attention but for different reasons. The real Jane is hardly a meek and insecure woman. In fact, she's a self-proclaimed sociopath and before moving back to Minneapolis, she had a great career as an import-export attorney and lived in a nice apartment in Kuala Lumpur. There's only one reason she's back and leading a double life - getting revenge for her late best friend, Meg. 

Meg and Steven were a couple until his hot and cold behavior and his emotionally abusive streak led Meg to end her life. Meg's death shattered Jane's equilibrium considering how close they used to be; and this has led Jane to lose all interest in life and decided to avenge for Meg. Jane is familiar with Steven’s gaslighting antics; after all she'd heard enough of his behaviours through Meg and she felt angry that her best friend had chosen to ignore or gave reasons for Steven’s behaviours. Jane has nothing to lose as she's prepared to bring Steven down along with his family members, but her encounter with an old friend/ex-lover complicates her plans. 

Whether if it was a case of character study of Jane (yes, she does has some issues) or a story about revenge, Jane Doe made a compelling read with the developments for both the characterisations and the storyline. Jane was an intriguing character; and I liked her fearlessness and her loyalty towards her friend. Her self-proclaimed as a sociopath may not portray her in a positive light, yet it didn't deem her as an anti-heroine either the more I learnt about her. There are some topics which are difficult to read but they delve into the issues of what some women are facing in the real world. Jane will appear in another book titled Problem Child and it looks like she's met her match with her teenage niece. 
© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

St. Martin's Press | 5 January 2021 | 304 pgs
Source: Library 


When I first heard that The Wife Upstairs is a Southern Gothic twist on Jane Eyre, I knew I've to read it. 

Jane Bell (not her real name) moved to Birmingham, Alabama, to escape from her past. Having lived by a foster care system, she knew how harsh life could be and with a secret to hide, she changed her identity and become a dog-walker in Thornfield Estates where the rich resides and no one will notice even if she's stolen a few pieces of their jewelry. Jane knew she could never fit into the community of those bored and gossipy housewives, until a chance encounter with Eddie Rochester changes that fate.

Eddie is charming, handsome and a widower. Having lost his wife, Bea, six months ago, Eddie remains a mysterious resident considering he rarely mingle with the others. Surprisingly, Jane and Eddie hit it off rather quickly and in no time, Jane soon catches the attention of the other housewives and gradually becomes part of the group. She then learns a bit more about Bea; that she was a successful retail entrepreneur and she and her other friend, Blanche, were both drowned in a boating accident. Their bodies were never found, and the sad tragedy becomes a memory within the community but Jane is intrigued by Bea and most of all, is curious about her relationship with Eddie and the boating accident as well. As things began to escalate between Jane and Eddie, Jane's curiosity towards Bea also intensifies as it seems Eddie is keeping some secrets of his own. Is Eddie who she thinks he is? Perhaps Bea's death is not accidental as everyone thinks it is? 

This book was a page-turner. The author has a way of writing that pulls you in and never let go and all the characters are intriguing, too. While there're a few elements which are reminiscent of Jane Eyre, this book stands firmly on its own with the writing and tone. The characterisations are well depicted and though most of them aren't likeable, it clearly defines the social class differences and the behaviorism which ensue as a result. I'd mixed feelings towards Jane as on one hand, her situation was pitiable yet on the other hand, she could be despicable in some ways. The suspense was another draw of the story, though the ending could be fairly predictable if you're a regular reader of the suspense genre but still, that didn't diminish my reading pleasure as I mentioned before, the author's writing was engaging. I'll be curious to see what she has in store next. 
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Melody

 

Berkley | 21 July 2020 | 400 pgs
Source: Library 

Road trips are supposed to be fun, right? Well, not the case in this book.

Beth, Portia and Eddie Morgan are siblings and they haven't contact one another in years. When their grandfather passed, the three siblings come together not to grief but to go on a cross-country road trip to fulfill his final wish before securing their inheritance. There are some "rules" to follow stated on the will; and one of them is not losing their grandfather's ashes as they go on the trip. Beth and Eddie brought their spouses along while Portia is single. 

Now family ties and relationships can be complicated; and the reader soon learned about this three siblings' childhood and their memories and secrets surrounding their missing elder sister. Most of all, it also tells about their road trip with their grandfather when they were young; along with the family dynamics and how it'd implicate the current situation they're all in now. 

As they begin their road trip, they soon learn that trust could be easily diminished by a simple act and it'd be hard to earn back that trust especially if that person happens to be your spouse. Secrets aside, the group of five also faces the threat of a black car following them and finding ways to disrupt their journey, although they couldn't find any proof and the driver is good at playing cat-and-mouse game with them. It's no surprise that this trip get them all on edge and agitated, but they'll strive on since money is a powerful motivator and nothing could get in their way, not even murder. 

This book wowed me on so many levels. First, there's the plot which I find it so refreshing. The dynamics between this group of dysfunctional siblings and their spouses add some drama and intrigue to the story, but most of all, Beth's voice and her inner thoughts really got to me. She's sharp, snarky and she knows how to hide her feelings well. She has a dark side, but then so do her other siblings so no one is likeable or trustful here. Aside from Beth's narrative, I was also drawn by the anonymous journal entries written during the past and they definitely add some mystery and depth to the story. Overall, this was a highly addicting read albeit some craziness to it (the ending left me stumped, though); and I bet once you've closed this book you'll be thinking of this story whenever you go on a road trip. 

Note: The author stated that all of the attractions, tourist sites, and museums in this book are real (e.g. Helen Keller's House in Alabama to Codger Pole in Washington, just to name a few). 
© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

Berkley | 18 February 2020 | 315 pgs
Source: Library 


Former NYPD detective Shana Merchant had a brush with death thirteen months ago after she was abducted by a notorious serial killer. Flawed and not fully emotionally healed from the abduction, Shana's condition has improved a little after seeking treatment from a therapist, who's stopped seeing her as a patient ever since they'd started seeing each other. He's now her fiancé. 

Since Shana's condition has gotten better, she's now back to work in her fiancé's sleepy hometown in the Thousand Islands region of Upstate New York, and find herself working with local investigator, Tim Wellington. He's received a call from a Sinclair family that one of their family members is missing. Shana and Tim are assigned to travel to the island to gather more information with the assurance from their department that more manpower would be dispatched thereafter. However, Shana and Tim gather little information except to learn that Jasper, the missing man, has left no traces except a blood-soaked bed which he'd shared with his girlfriend. His girlfriend claimed she didn't hear anything, but that's maybe her mind is fuzzy from the drinks they'd had the previous night. 

Tim's initial guess is that they're dealing with a runaway case, but Shana doesn't think so after interviewing the Sinclairs (including their caretaker and the girlfriend) and find their dynamics complicated and on edge. To complicate matters, Shana and Tim find themselves cut off from the mainland and police's manpower as the storm strikes the island, leaving all of them stranded and with a possibly restless murderer around. As Shana continues to find the truth and secrets surrounding the Sinclairs, she is soon faced with more uncertainties as Tim's reliability is thrown into question and her biggest challenge is finding faith in herself again as her trauma-fueled flashbacks are returning and she has no one to rely on but herself. 

The setup of this story was great - chilling, atmospheric and with a touch of Agatha Christie vibe. The dynamics and the complexity relationship of the Sinclairs, combines with the claustrophobic setting, made a riveting read and all the more seeing Shana battling her own demons. The Sinclairs make up of a cast of unusual characters and while not all are unlikeable, their morality is most often questioned and what motivates Jasper's disappearance remains the crux of this thriller. There's also an exploration of Shana's relationship with her fiancé; considering she was his patient before. All in all, this was an intense thriller which captivated my attention from the beginning till the end and I'm glad to note that Shana will make her appearance again in the next book, The Dead Season

© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody


Headline | 21 January 2021 | 432 pgs
Source: Library 

The weather has been getting warmer over here and while I couldn't do anything about it, I could indulge in a book set in a cold place and let my imagination run wild. While a murder plot isn't what I'd had in mind, I thought it still makes a good temporary fix considering how much I like reading a locked-room mystery. 

The book opens with Milla getting an invitation for a reunion in the French Alps resort from one of her friends whom she didn't contact for ten years. She and Curtis go way back and they were all at the height of their snowboarding career then until Curtis's younger sister disappeared. While Milla doesn't want to be reminded of the past, she does miss Curtis and has been wondering how he's been doing. She is glad to find their other three friends are also coming along, until they reach the destination and find it totally deserted. Thinking it is off-season, they dismiss the unsettling feeling until their icebreaker game turns menacing. 

As they question themselves and the purpose of the trip, it turns out that no one really knows who has sent the invite and that someone wants them to be there for solely one purpose - to find out the truth surrounding Saskia's disappearance since her body has yet to be found. As the group of five struggles to find ways of leaving the place with limited manpower and resources, their biggest fear is that they didn't know who to trust and that their secrets ten years ago are about to come to light. 

Atmospheric and filled with intensity, this debut novel by Allie Reynolds easily captured my attention not only of the chilling premise but also the theme surrounding the story - snowboarding. Ms Reynolds was once a freestyle snowboarder in the UK top ten at halfpipe so it was a treat and an eye-opener to read about the experiences and challenges of snowboarding alongside the suspense (my deepest respect and admiration to all the athletes who train hard for their love of sports no matter how risky some of them can be). 

The balance between intrigue and intensity was effectively narrated by two alternative timeline and while this is a common trope used in many thrillers, this will remain as one of my favourites as far as (writing) style is concerned. The cast of characters are also well depicted through their personality and exchanges; as well as who they are and how they behave under a hyper-competitive and a dangerous environment. A captivating debut novel and I'll be sure to look out for the author's future releases. 
© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.
Melody

This week, allow me to take a break off of book reviews and let me introduce you to three K-dramas which I watched lately. (Currently watching Mouse and Navillera which are still ongoing.)


The Penthouse: War in Life (Season 1 & 2)

If you're into melodrama with a cast of secretive, unreliable characters, then look no further as this story will blow your mind with the twisty plots and developments as each episode goes. 

In a nutshell, this story is about power, wealth, ambitions and revenge surrounding a few residents living in a luxurious apartment named "Hera Palace". These various families are ambitious and like comparing and playing mind games while their children attend the same prestigious music school and like their parents, they'd do anything to outdo the others until someone died. The cause and effect of that murder quickly escalates into something more sinister as it brings out the darkness in these residents' mind; leading them to playing cruel games and more murders. 

Season 1 was exciting, but Season 2 got a bit old with what looked like more revenge and unbelievable plot twists (spoiler alert: resurrections of some characters so they could surprise and plot their plans of revenge and the games go on. Seriously?) And that's not the end of it as there'll be a Season 3 and it'd most likely air in June (?) 2021 if according to plans. I don't know about this upcoming season as it feels like a big stretch to me (hopefully, there's a sense of redemption and closure in some of these characters' awful actions.) That said, the cast performance was great and despite the over-exaggerated plots (and lots of yelling and throwing tantrums) at times, it still makes a (fun?) and an addicting watch if you're into twisty plots and twisted characters. (3.5 out of 5 stars round-off for both season)


Beyond Evil

This crime suspense drama won my approval with its intriguing premise, perfect story execution and not to mention the excellent performance of the cast. 

This story surrounds two detectives and depicts their differences from their background, personalities and their ways of solving cases. Lee Dong Sik (played by Shin Ha Kyun) works as an officer at Manyang Police Substation in a small city and beneath his quiet demeanour, he is actually a sentimental person who hasn't got over his traumatic past as a suspect of his sister's murder. In a village where the residents never tell and remember, it is hard to gauge their minds although they're quick to support one another should an outsider tries to invade into their lives. 

Detective Han Joo Won (played by Yeo Jin Goo) feels the unity of the Manyang residents after he is transferred to the same police substation and is assigned as Dong Sik's superior (also his partner). Joo Won comes from a distinguished background given his role at Seoul Police Station and that his father is nominated to be the next Commissioner General of the National Police Agency. 

The dynamics between Joo Won and Dong Sik is explosive, but a serial murder case forces them to work together; which in turn also raises some suspicion among the police staff if Dong Sik is involved and whether or not if Joo Won can be trusted considering he's an outsider. 

Despite the slow beginning, this story would capture your attention once the momentum picks up and questions will be raised as each character becomes unreliable and their actions blurry as the story progresses. There are lots of twists and turns as expected in this kind of story, but the draw lies in the two lead characters and the atmospheric Manyang with its close-knit community; which is full of secrets as it turns out eventually and how it'd impact everyone even after there's closure. Highly recommended! (5 out of 5 stars)
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Melody

 

Harper Voyager | 17 March 2020 | 432 pgs
Source: Library 
Crush the King is the last installment of Crown of Shards series and not surprisingly it was packed with more actions, more magic, and of course more murderous machinations and courtly intrigue surrounding rival kingdoms, Bellona and Morta. 

In the previous two installments (Kill the Queen and Protect the Prince), the reader read about how gladiator Everleigh Blair had took the throne of Bellona after the mass murder of the royal family, leaving her the last Blair to continue with the legacy and to lead the kingdom despite her role and her lack of experience. While Everleigh may be lacking in some courtly matters, she is after all a warrior trained gladiator but she has immunity to magic, which is her strength considering she also could "smell" magic and destroy them if necessary. Everleigh has never forgotten about the Seven Spire massacre and has vowed to take revenge and that time has finally come with the arrival of the Regalia Games, whereby the warriors, nobles and royals from all the kingdoms will come together to compete in various sporting events. 

Everleigh may have a grudge against Maeven who had murdered the last queen, but she is more wary of her half brother, Maximus, the conniving king of Morta who doesn't take humanity kindly and will dispose anyone who gets in his way. Although Maeven is his half sister, she's also considered a bastard sister to Maximus so he often give her a cold treatment, which in turn leads to another interesting segment to the already complicated courtly machinations. 

This installment may be the last of the series, but I felt the ending leaves some possibility of a future book featuring the world of Crown of Shards and true enough, the author will have an all-new trilogy coming out in July 2021 featuring a new heroine (well, not new if you read this series). Truth be told, I was actually sad to see this trilogy has come to an end. It was like reading an adventurous coming-of-age story although this isn't categorised as YA genre. It was great to see how Everleigh has matured over the time and see her ambition changes for the sake of Bellona and the people. Her relationship with her friends was one of the fun things to read alongside the battles and they definitely deserve some attention considering they're Everleigh's entourage when plotting and fighting are concerned. I also find the worldbuilding fascinating; and not to mention the magic elements and the Strix creatures which give magical power to anyone who drinks their blood. I'd recommend this series if you like an extraordinary fantasy. 
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Melody

HQ | 7 January 2021 | 352 pgs
Source: Library 

77-year-old Judith Potts is single and lives alone in a mansion inherited from her late aunt, Betty. Judith is happy with her life; after all she doesn't have to report to anyone and she can drink whisky anyhow or anytime she likes. She passes her time setting crosswords for the national newspapers and life doesn't get much better until one evening changes her life thereafter. 

On that fateful evening, she is out swimming in the Thames and she hears shouting from her neighbour's garden, followed by the sound of a gunshot. She then reports what she's heard to the police, hoping they'd send someone to investigate but they don't believe her and thought she might have heard wrongly. Afterall, Marlow has a low crime rate and it is not often they'd come across a serious crime, let alone a murder case. But Judith trusts her instincts and decides to investigate for herself. Her determination has paid off as she eventually finds her neighbour's body but the police thinks there's a possibility between the case of an accident and a suicide attempt. 

Judith didn't want to argue with the police and their disbelief has further fueled her determination in solving the case more. She is soon joined by the neighbourhood's dog walker, Suzie, and the prim and proper Vicar's wife, Becks. Together they formed "The Marlow Murder Club". What begins as a simple sleuthing soon becomes their "full-time job" as they realise they may be dealing with a serial killer when another body is found. Together with DS Tanika Malik (who's come to acknowledge their individual abilities eventually), they'll soon learn that some residents aren't who they seem to be and that one day the past would return to haunt no matter how one keeps it quietly. 

This book was a delight to read. Perhaps that's a wrong word to use considering this is a book about murders, but I loved the author's prose (serious yet humorous at times) and most of all, the various cast of characters that make this mystery so much intriguing through their dialogues and their characteristics. Judith was a remarkable character; she was a true hero (yes, she does wear a cape sometimes) and I liked it that she's feisty and opinionated and doesn't allow anything (or anyone) to bring her down. Her friendship with Suzie and Becks made me smile; and then there's DS Malik who brings in some conflicts to the story through her own issues and how she and the trio work together to crack the case. I also liked it that the mystery was multi-layered and like Judith's crossword puzzles, you need to think from various angles and other possibilities, too. As you can tell, I enjoyed this book and I'm glad to note that a sequel will be published in December 2021 (source).

© 2021 Melody's Reading Corner (https://mel-reading-corner.blogspot.sg/), All Rights Reserved. If you are reading this post from other site(s), please take note that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.